Psalm 101 and Twitter

During Morning Prayer today, Psalm 101 stood out for me. Recently I have decided to renew my social media presence and in that process decided to delete my old Twitter account and start a new one that was entirely focused on Christianity, catholicism and Anglicanism. I have been at it for just over two weeks and it has been a complete change in my online activity. It is certainly a change for the better from the negativity of politics and news that flooded my timeline and thus my life with my old account.

But Psalm 101 today read like a clear Christian manifesto for following and blocking people on Twitter.


I will not set before my eyes whatever is base. The man who slanders his neighbor in secret I will bring to silence. There is some powerful stuff there for sure.

Increase in us, Lord, your gift of faith,
so that the praise we offer you
may ever yield its fruit from heaven.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Feature image by Samuel Martins on Unsplash.

Collect – 12th Sunday after Trinity

I’ve begun praying the canonical hours from the Anglican Breviary. It is an English translation of the version of the Roman Breviary of Pope Pius X commonly called Divino Afflatu with Collects and some other incidentals from the Book of Common Prayer vice the Roman Missal. In other words a truly and more– certainly so than the Morning and Evening Prayer in the BCP and the Liturgy of the Hours in the Roman Catholic today– catholic expression of the canonical hours.

Because of the English translation and insertion of BCP prayers, there are often delightful nuggets of extremely well-written prose. This is the advantage of worship in the vernacular and done right no less. See this example from the Collect for the 12th Sunday after Trinity (the Collect I prayed at each Hour during any feria this following week).

ALMIGHTY and everlasting God, who art always more ready to hear than we art to pray, and art wont to give more than either we desire or deserve: pour down upon us the abundance of thy mercy; forgiving us those things whereof our conscience is afraid, and giving us those things which we are not worthy to ask, but through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, thy Son our Lord. Who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Collect, 12th Sunday after Trinity

The attribution of the character of God expressed in “who art always more ready to hear that we art to pray” and “art wont to give more than either we desire or deserve” is topped only by the admission that “those things which we are not worthy to ask, but through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ”. Beautiful.