2018 Summer Series

The summer doldrums are in full effect and if you are like most catholic oriented Christians you are grateful for the rest after very busy Christmas and Easter seasons (still can’t get over the fourth Sunday of Advent and Christmas Eve being the same and then shortly diving into Lent and Easter this year). Now that we’ve had some peace and quiet around here you’ve probably noticed an uptick in activity around this blog. We’ve been busy preparing a series of posts from the Proper of the Saints in the Christian Prayer that forms part of the Liturgy of the Hours and Anglican saints from the Anglican Church of Canada publication All of the Saints. We intend on keeping these posts up through-out the entire year (although we have yet to decide what to do once the full year cycle is complete).

Book of Common Prayer

In addition to the saint posts, we will be introducing a summer series for this year (and hopefully all of the rest of the years to follow). We’ve decided the first theme of this series for summer 2018 will be the catholic liturgy. We will explore the catholic Mass in its entirety with a historic eye toward the development of the Roman Missal and the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. The liturgy that we will focus on will be the catholic one specifically comprised of the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. I will rely on two main sources for inspiration of the posts, namely the Oxford History of Christian Worship and For The Life of the World by Alexander Schmemann.

Each instalment of the series will focus on a particular aspect of the Mass. We will explore the historical development of how the Mass exists today and the biblical and theological roots of the service itself. Two final instalments will close out the series, one on the overall development of catholic liturgy and another on music within Mass. I hope to have a new series instalment out each week over the summer period. It is my hope that by the end we will all have gained a better understanding of the catholic liturgy and that this knowledge will enrich our participation into the future.

Image credit.

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